Mosque

After the Attack: Building a Lasting Movement Against Racism

After the Attack: Building a Lasting Movement Against Racism

The morning of March 15 was incredible. Thousands of young people were on strike from school, marching in the streets of Aotearoa, demanding action on climate change; demanding a better future. For many of them, it was their first ever experience of politics, and their first ever feeling of people power.

Then the news started coming in. 51 people murdered in Christchurch. Two mosques attacked. I’ve never before felt such a dizzying change in emotions: from extreme optimism, to shock, horror, rage. A lot of people believed that “this could never happen here”. But it has.

Over the last year, the anti-racist left have been increasingly alarmed about the rise of a small but militant far-right in this country. We’ve been holding counter-protests against rallies which have been opposing a non-binding UN treaty on migration and supporting British Nazi Tommy Robinson. Even so, Friday 15 was beyond our worst fears. “Here’s your UN Migration Pact!” was written on the killer’s gun.

People are also responding to the attacks by saying that we shouldn’t give the killer’s ideas any attention. But this is not just an isolated incident. It’s a politically motivated hate crime. We must name the ideology behind the terror. Fascism.

Anti-racist organisers were worried that racist violence could happen here, precisely because we know that fascism is the most dangerous ideology in the world; because the conditions which cause fascism to rise are here today. We know from the history of Europe that the only way to stop fascism is to name it, and to organise people to fight against it. Ignoring fascism only ever lets it spread.

Fascism is weaponised despair, which emerges in times of capitalist crisis. Italian socialist Antonio Gramsci, who spent the last years of his life in a fascist jail, described its roots in his Prison Notebooks, saying:

“The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born; in this interregnum, a great variety of morbid symptoms appear.”

The fascist movement comes from people who witness society falling apart, see no hope for the future, and rather than blaming the top 1% who control society, they find scapegoats: migrants, ethnic and religious minorities, LGBT people, trade unionists, socialists, and in particular, Jews and Muslims. Fascism seeks to abolish democracy; to destroy all unions and left-wing parties; and to establish an ethnically, culturally and religiously “pure” corporate dictatorship.

The only way in which they are correct is this: society is in a profound state of crisis. Wages in Aotearoa have been stagnant since the 90s. We have the worst housing crisis in the OECD, with 40,000 people homeless. 700,000 people live in poverty, including 220,000 children. Mental health problems are rampant. Meanwhile, the richest million Kiwis own nearly 3x the wealth of the other 4 million of us combined.

Of course, Muslims, migrants, LGBT and the left are not to blame. The real culprits are the wealthy and powerful — the bosses and landlords who have rigged the economy in their own interests, and the politicians who have helped them. Political fault lies with both Labour and National, who took turns rigging the system in the 1980s and 1990s, and who have over several decades failed completely to fix the system.

A hero of mine used to say:

“Progress has been made by two flames which have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice; and the flame of hope that we can build a better world.”

Tony Benn

We need to fan the flame of hope to succeed in this struggle. We have to destroy fascism and dismantle capitalism; but we also need to know what we’re fighting for. We need a real alternative: jobs and houses for all; a pay rise for all workers; the end of poverty; a refugee quota of 10,000 a year. That is the response we need to this hateful attack.

So how do we fight for a positive alternative? Those at the top of society will not do it for us. The answer is the people.

Hope in this time of darkness is hard to feel — but there is still immense cause for it. There have been huge displays of aroha in the past week. On the beautiful morning of Friday 15, tens of thousands of school children marched for a better world, and discovered their own power for the first time. Something special happened that morning, which through all our other emotions of shock and grief must not be forgotten.

When workers and students unite, regardless of race or religion, to fight for a better society, we can never be defeated. Let that be the ultimate lesson of March 15. When we stand together to challenge racism and all other forms of injustice, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. While fascism represents the worst kind of hopelessness, a mass movement against hatred and for a fairer system has the potential to show everybody that there is actually hope for the future after all.

4,000 people marched against racism, Islamophobia and fascism in Auckland on 24 March 2019. Photo by Bruce Crossan.



This article has been republished. You can read the original here.

Elliot Crossan is a socialist writer and activist.

24 March, 2019

Posted by Elliot Crossan in New Zealand politics, 0 comments